Solar Power

Solar in Your Community Challenge

Solar in Your Community Challenge

The SunShot Initiative has announced the Solar in Your Community Challenge, a new prize competition that aims to improve solar electricity access to underserved communities across the country. 

Offering $5 million in cash prizes and technical assistance (TA) over 18 months, the Challenge encourages communities to work together to create replicable, innovative business and financial models that expand solar to low- and moderate-income households. Because not all Americans own their rooftop, the Challenge aims to spur the development of inclusive solutions—like community solar—to help even more Americans go solar. 

There are a few ways you can participate:

  • Create a team: Work with local businesses, nonprofits, schools, and community leaders to either develop a portfolio of solar projects or create new programs that extend solar access to LMI households and nonprofits.
  • Become an expert: Provide coaching or serve as a subject matter expert to teams as they develop their projects throughout the Challenge. 

Early applications for teams and experts are due January 6th. Team applications include a three-page written application, a short video, and a short public-facing description, that describes your project or program’s impact.  Learn more about how the competition works and apply today

Stories of Solar Video Series

Stories of Solar Video Series

The Southern Environmental Law Center (SELC) recently launched a website and video series to tell the stories of the many residents of the Southeast who are using and supporting solar power in their states. From a former coal miner turned solar installer in Alabama to a farmer in North Carolina, from a pastor in Georgia to high school students in Virginia, everyone has their own reasons for wanting to go solar. And this new video campaign is an effort to ensure their stories are heard.

You can view the website, entitled Stories of Solar, at www.stories.solar, where you will see these Southerners share their stories in their own words about why they went solar; what it’s meant for their home, business, or community; and why they want to see policy changed to level the playing field in their states.

Solar power can have a lasting positive impact on our environment, communities, and families; it stimulates job growth, decreases energy costs, and promotes energy independence. South Carolina’s Solar Act kick-started the state’s solar industry, but there is more to be done. Policymakers should work to encourage competitive solar investments and make sure solar opportunities are available to all South Carolinians.